28 September, 2020

A-C of Dover’s Streets, Ancient And Modern

Sourced by kind permission of Derek Leach from his book ‘Streets of Dover’

Abbey Road  is a continuation of Barwick Road and takes its name from St. Radigund’s Abbey to which it leads beyond the town boundary.

Abbot’s Walk was on the Buckland Estate. Most of the streets in the Buckland Estate built before the Second World War took their names from characters in Chaucer’s Canterbury Tales.

Abbots (The), 9 is a modern extension (around 2000) of Priory Hill. Sitting above the site of the old priory and on Priory Hill, this was a good choice of name.

Adelaide Crescent was on the Buckland Estate. It was part of the post Second World War Buckland Housing Estate where most of the streets were named after towns or locations in the Commonwealth or the United States, emphasising the role that the Commonwealth and the US played during the War. It was redeveloped later in the 20th century.

Adelaide Place ran from Water Lane to Hawkesbury Street in the Pier District and was named after William IV’s (1830-37) wife and dates from that time.

Adrian Court was off Adrian Street and its houses were built at the same time. It is listed in the 1841 census.

Adrian Row  ran from the top of old Adrian Street to Albany Place. See Adrian Street. Originally called Upwall or Above Wall, the latter appeared in St.Mary’s Vestry records as far back as 1639. It was probably thus named as the street was above the medieval walls of the town, but was renamed Adrian Street to mark the site of Adrian Gate, one of the town’s gates. Its houses were demolished in 1937 and replaced with new houses and flats.

Albany Place now connects Princes Street with Adrian Street. It was named in 1882 after the Duke of Albany, a son of Queen Victoria, who visited his brother, the Duke of Connaught, when quartered in Dover.

Albert Road runs from Maison Dieu Road to Salisbury Road. Named in honour of Prince Albert, following his death in 1861, the road was built in 1870 as part of the intended Dover Castle Estate, which was replanned later by William Crundall who built fine residences on the remainder.

Alberta Close is off Selkirk Road. It is part of the post Second World War Buckland Housing Estate where all the streets were named after towns or locations in the Commonwealth or the United States, emphasising the role that the Commonwealth and the US played during the War.

Alberta Way wasadopted in 1982, but no longer exists due to redevelopment. It was part of the post Second World War Buckland Housing Estate where all the streets were named after towns or locations in the Commonwealth or the United States, emphasising the role that the Commonwealth and the US played during the War.

Albion Place was by Chapel Place. The Albion pub, later renamed the Carpenter’s Arms was close by and was presumably a watering hole of the builder. It is listed in the 1841 census.

Alexandra Place is off London Road. Princess Alexandra of Denmark married the future Edward VII in 1863 and this road was built about ten years later. It was adopted by the borough in 1891.

Alfred Place was at the top of Castle Street  Presumably named after the Saxon King Alfred, it is shown on an 1851 map, but now forms part of Castle Street.

Alfred Road is off Lorne Road. Nnamed presumably after the Saxon King Alfred, it was built in 1899/1901 by William Crundall on the old Brook Ditch Meadow and was extended in 1940.

Alma Place was part of Charlton Green where it joined Peter Street. This neat little row of cottages adjoining Charlton Green was built during the Crimean War and named after the Battle of Alma. It was demolished to allow for the expansion of Dover Engineering Works.

Anselm Road is off Noah’s Ark Road. Built in 1928 by the borough council, it was named after an early Archbishop of Canterbury who was canonised in 1494. Following war damage, some prefabs were erected in 1948.

Anstee Road, off Shooter’s Hill, is a post World War II housing development and was adopted in 1980. The origin of the name is unknown.

Approach Road is off Folkestone Road leading to Manor Road. Originally part of Manor Road, it was later given this name after a pair of cottages in the approach to Manor Road. It was adopted in 1922.

Archcliffe Road is now a continuation of Limekiln Street and both form part of the modern A20 dual carriageway. It was previously called Bulwark Hill. The road was so named formally in 1878 because it led to Archcliffe Fort, built by Henry VIII on the site of an earlier fortification built by Richard II in 1379. The name also appears, however, on Eldred’s map of 1641.

Archcliffe Square, Pier district was close by Archcliffe. It is listed in the 1841 census with many houses, but by 1898 had been demolished.

Arthur’s Place ran from St. James’ Street to Clarence Street. Taking the Duke of Wellington’s Christian name, it was part of the demolished St. James’ Street area.

Ashen Tree Lane  runs from Castle Street to Maison Dieu Road. Apparently a large ash tree stood in the grounds of the dairyman’s house that still stands. The lane is shown on an 1851 map and a dairy existed there in 1671.

Astley Avenue is off Barton Road. Part of William Crundall’s Barton Farm Estate laid out 1890-1900, it was adopted in 1906 and commemorates a prominent 19th century Dover citizen, Dr. Astley, who was mayor 1858-9 and provided at his own expense an isolation hospital at Tower Hamlets.

Astor Avenue joins Tower Hamlets and Elms Vale. It was opened in 1923 by J. J. Astor MP for Dover and named after him.

Athol Terrace and Court are above the entrance to Eastern Docks. This terrace certainly existed by 1847 when a dispute over jurisdiction was settled. The court decided that the terrace was in the parish of Guston for ecclesiastical purposes but in Dover for municipal authority! Apparently a Mrs MacIntyre purchased number 3 when these houses, beyond East Cliff, were built and suggested the name after Blair Athol in Scotland.

Auckland Crescent is off Melbourne Avenue. It is part of the post Second World War Buckland Housing Estate. All the streets were named after towns or locations in the Commonwealth or the United States, emphasising the role that the Commonwealth and the US played during the War.

Auden Way, off Astor Avenue, was built in 2008/9 on the site of Astor Junior School built in the 1920s. W H Auden, playwright and poet, was a regular visitor to Dover in the 1930s who wrote a poem about Dover.

Avenue Road  runs from Frith Road to Beaconsfield Avenue.  The developers had presumably run out of names when this strangely named road was built. Part of it was adopted in 1894 and the remainder in 1906.

Baker’s Alley or Passage is thought to be the alley from Tower Street up to North Street. Apparently it was originally called Slip Alley, but in the late 1800s a widow lived in the end house and opened her front room as a sweet shop, which became known as Granny Baker’s.

Baker’s Close.  Now called Priory Hill, it was part of the nine acres given originally to the monks of Dover Priory to establish a bakery. See Priory Hill.

Bakers Lane is mentioned in the Paving Commissioners’ minutes 1838 and may be what was also known as Baker’s Alley.

Balfour Road is off Cherry Tree Avenue. It was laid out at the end of the 19th century and named after Arthur Balfour before he became Prime Minister, but was already a well-known politician. Part was adopted in 1903 and the remainder in 1939.

Bartholomew Close  ran from London Road to Chapel Hill and dates from about 1866 and was named after Bartholomew Fields.

Bartholomew Street runs from Churchill Street to Beaconsfield Road. It was built in 1882 on Bartholomew Fields where Bartlemy Fair was held until 1830. This fair went back to the days of St. Bartholomew’s Hospital for lepers (founded 1152).

Barton Path  runs beside the river from Charlton Green to Cherry Tree Avenue, which was part of the ancient Manor of Barton..

Barton Road runs from Frith Road to Buckland Avenue. Previously a lane known as ‘Back o’ Barton,’ it was named Barton Road in 1879 and widened in 1891 and then developed. It was in the Manor of Barton/Barton Farm area.

Barton View Terrace off Alexandra Place and built at the same time. Presumably, it once had a view of Barton Farm lands.

Barwick Road runs from the top of Coombe Valley road to St. Radigund’s Road and was named after the builder, Alderman R. J.Barwick, who was mayor in 1921, 1923, 1926 and 1927 when this part of the council housing estate was built.

Barwicks Alley. Described by Bavington Jones as a notorious rookery, this cramped and insanitary old alley off High Street (where the empty Salvation Army Citadel now stands) was built by Mr Barwick in 1823 but was condemned in 1875 as being unfit for habitation and demolished in 1882.Strangely, when smallpox came to Dover in 1872 none of the 36 residents was affected – a grim joke of the time was that the epidemic looked in but was afraid to enter!

Barwicks Court was off High Street in 1875 directory. This was probably Barwick’s Alley – see above.

Bartholomew Close was laid out in 1866 by Mr S Tucker on land formerly part of the medieval St. Bartholomew’s Hospital.

Bastion Road, Western Heights. It was laid out originally by the military during the 19th century as part of the Western Heights fortifications and barracks.

Beach Street, Pier District appears on Eldred’s map of 1641. Running parallel to the Town Station, which was built on the site of the Townsend Battery in 1844, the street was built on shingle known as Plain Beach where previously there was a beach road with fishermen’s huts, shipbuilders’ and sailors’ houses. On the sea side was a pilots’ lookout. The street was demolished in 1976 to provide a parking area for ferry traffic.

Beaconsfield Avenue continues Beaconsfield Road to Barton Road. It was built on the site of Barton Farm by William Crundall soon after 1900. Lord Beaconsfield was the title taken by Disraeli, the Victorian prime minister.

Beaconsfield Road runs from London Road to Beaconsfield Avenue. The south side was built in 1882 by a Conservative named Tucker and named after the Conservative Prime Minister, Disraeli, who became Lord Beaconsfield. The north side of the road was Dover’s cricket field until 1897 when the road was widened and the field built upon.

Beaufoy Road and Terrace is off St. Radigund’s Road. They were named after C. E. Beaufoy, mayor of Dover and chairman of the Housing Committee when this road was laid out. It was built by the borough council in 1933/34.

Beaumont Terrace in Folkestone Road. Lord Beaumont bought Westmount in Folkestone Road and all the adjoining land, intending to found a monastery, but the project fell through and the land was sold and built upon in the 19th century.

Becket’s Walk. .Roads in the Buckland Estate built before the Second World War take their names from characters in Chaucer’s Canterbury Tales. This walk on the Buckland Estate, built immediately after the Second World War, was named after Thomas Becket, the murdered Archbishop of Canterbury, whose shrine Chaucer’s characters were visiting.

Belgrave Road is off the Folkestone Road. Part of Sir William Crundall’s Clarendon Estate, it was built in 1875/78, named in 1882 and adopted in 1901.

Bench Street is a continuation of King Street to Townwall Street. One of Dover’s medieval streets, it was probably named after The Bench area which existed in front of Severus town gate (on the site of New Bridge). This in turn got its name from a bench in the gate tower where people gathered to chat or transact business.

Cambridge Road is off New Bridge. It was named after the Duke of Cambridge and built in 1834 from Cambridge Terrace to the Wellington Bridge (Union Street). It now ends at the Dover Harbour Board car park. In 1906 it contained shipbuilding yards, rail ferry workshops, Crundall’s coal yard and, strangely, Lambert’s photographic studio.

Cambridge Terrace Built in 1856, it was named after the Duke of Cambridge, a frequent visitor to the town. This fine block of terraced houses ran from Northampton Street, but is now part of New Bridge and Cambridge Road.

Camden Crescent runs from New Bridge to Wellesley Road. The Marquis of Camden was Lord Lieutenant of Kent and a member of the Harbour Board when this street was named in 1840.

Cannon Street runs from Biggin Street to Market Square. Mary Horsley claimed that the name derives from the Canons of St Martin Le Grand using the street to service St. Mary’s.  Canon Ward existed in 1520 covering the St. Peter’s Church/Stembrook area. Another explanation is that it is named after the Cannon family. John Cannon lived in the street below the church. Opposite was his farmyard and bakery where the Royal Oak later stood. John also owned a garden called Queen’s Garden, named after Elizabeth I. John, who was mayor in 1716, was the son of Captain Henry Cannon, Deputy Governor of Dover Castle during the Commonwealth. Bavington Jones states that Captain Henry owned property in the street in the 1650s. Yet another explanation suggested by him is that it was named after Richard Cannon, Deacon of the Baptist Church, who owned property in the street. The street was widened in 1858 and again in 1893. It was pedestrianised in 1981.

Canon’s Walk  This is a post Second World War path, running from Knight’s Way to Squire’s Way on the Buckland Estate, and was named after a character from Chaucer’s Canterbury Tales.

Carlsden Close is a cul de sac off Crabble Hill and was built by Carlsden Properties in 1974.

Carolina Walk, was on the Buckland Estate. Part of the post Second World War Buckland Housing Estate, where most of the streets were named after towns or locations in the Commonwealth or the United States, emphasising the role that the Commonwealth and the US played during the War. It was demolished in 1965 as part of redevelopment.

Caroline Place was off Church Street. When the estranged queen of George IV returned to England in 1820, staying at the York Hotel, there was much excitement in the town – with some people supporting her for her and some the king. Edward Thompson, the mayor, had to read the Riot Act. The builder of this blind alley must have been for her! The street, off Stembrook, disappeared in 1954 following war damage and post war clearance

Castle Avenue runs from Frith Road to Godwyne Road and was laid out by William Crundall 1881 to 1883 on land formerly part of the Dover Castle lands.

Castle Hill Road is now a continuation of Castle Street, built by the military in 1797 from the end of St. James’ Street to provide a better access road to the castle and to the Deal road rather than the old steep zig zag, which still exists as a public walk laid out in 1886.

Castle Place ran from St. James’ Street to Castle Street. It appears on an 1851 map.

Castle Street runs from Market Square to Castle Hill. Built between 1830 and 1835 from Castle Hill, it did not provide access to the Market Square until 1836/7 when the stables of the Antwerp Hotel were demolished. It provides a marvellous view of the castle from the Market Square.

Castlemount Road is a cul de sac off Godwyne Road. Castlemount was a mansion with extensive grounds erected by W J Adcock for Robert Chignell in 1876 to accommodate his school. The grounds were terraced into attractive lawns, which were opened to the public sometimes during the summer. This road, apparently called Clinton Road originally, was adopted in 1893 and redeveloped in 1990 with modern housing.

Cave’s Court was off Worthing ton Street. William Cave, a watchmaker and jeweller, had a business in Biggin Street in the 1870s and built six cottages at the rear with access from Worthington Street.

Centre Road , Western Heights. Not an inspring name, this was one of several roads built in the 1950s on the Western Heights to provide housing for Borstal Institution officers.

Chamberlain Road runs from Northbourne Avenue to Hamilton Road. It was laid out and named by William Crundall, but not built upon by the council until 1925 who retained the original name.  Joseph Chamberlain was yet another leading Conservative, a Birmingham industrialist, who became a Liberal MP in 1876, but later left Gladstone’s government being opposed to home rule for Ireland. He led the Liberal Unionists into an alliance with the Conservatives, becoming a Conservative minister in Salisbury’s government and splitting the party over the free trade issue in 1903. This led to the Liberal landslide in 1906.

Channel View Road runs from the modern Elizabeth Street. Built in 1983 on the slopes of the Western Heights, its name needs no explanation.

Chapel Court was off Snargate Street. This old court was demolished in 1938 as part of a slum clearance programme.

Chapel Hill was off Buckland Terrace, London Road.  It was named not after the Methodist chapel built in 1839 (now the King’s Hall) but after the Chapel of St. Bartholomew in the medieval leper hospital that stood on the hill, long known as Chapel Mount, until the Dissolution. An 1851 map shows the road.

Chapel Lane See Grubbin’s Lane

Chapel Place is now a cul de sac off Adrian Street. It ran originally from Adrian Street to Queen Street until slum clearance in the 1930s and took its name from the Baptist (now Unitarian ) Chapel built in 1820. Previously it was known as King’s Highway Above Wall.

Chapel Square (or Plain) was in the Pier District and is mentioned in the Paving Commissioners’ minutes 1783

Chapel Street ran from Adrian Street to Snargate Street. It appears to date from the building of the Baptist Chapel (now Unitarian Church) in 1820 to which it led from Snargate Street. It was stopped up and diverted in 1961.

Charlton Avenue is a cul de sac off Barton Road and was built around 1910 on the site of Barton Farm in the parish of Charlton.

Charlton Green is a continuation of Maison Dieu Road from The Grapes public house to Beaconsfield Road and was adopted in 1906. In ancient times there was a manor of Charlton attached to the Barony of Chilham mentioned in Domesday Book. No doubt this ancient village had its green here.

Chaucer Crescent runs from Roosevelt Road to The Linces. It is another of the roads in ‘poets’corner’ on the Buckland Estate, built after the Second World War.

Cherry Tree Lane/Avenue runs from Barton Road to London Road. Probably named after the original Cherry Tree Inn, which was already standing in 1814 and at that time was possibly the only building between Black Horse Lane and The Bull at Buckland Bridge. The lane was widened in 1895 and renamed avenue.

Chesters Court was between 43 and 44 Snargate Street.

Chestnut Road is a modern development off Elms Vale Road. It was built in 1989 and probably took its name from the chestnut trees in the adjacent Dover College sports field.

Chevalier Road is a cul de sac off Chevalier Road. The Monins family held land in the Elms Vale area for centuries. John Henry Monins lived at Ringwould House when several streets were laid out in this area around 1900 and Chevalier Road was named after two of his aunts. It was adopted in 1938.

Christchurch Court is a modern development of flats on the site of demolished Christchurch in Folkestone Road.

Christchurch Steps. See Effingham Passage.

Christchurch Way is a cul de sac off Dunedin Drive. Built in 1990, it is part of the post Second World War Buckland Housing Estate. All the streets were named after towns or locations in the Commonwealth or the United States, emphasising the role that the Commonwealth and the US played during the War.

Church Court, was off Dieu Stone Lane. It appears on an 1851 map.

Church Place was beside St Mary’s Church running into Stembrook. See Church Street. This old Dover street, built about 1840 and listed in the 1841 census, did not survive the Second World War.

Church Road runs from Folkestone Road to Elms Vale Road. Named in 1901 when St. Martin’s Church was built to service the new housing development, part of the Monins Estate.

Church Street runs from Castle Street to Stembrook. First called Church Lane, running originally from the Market Square to Caroline Place, it was laid out following the demolition of St. Peter’s Church around 1600. The land was sold by the mayor in 1590 with the authority of Elizabeth I to provide funds to improve the struggling harbour, but it is said that the mayor left town without handing over the proceeds.

Churchill Road runs from Maxton Road to Shakespeare Road. It was adopted in 1898 and may have been named after the poet whose grave is in Cowgate Cemetery, or after Randolph Churchill, the Conservative politician and father of Winston who died in 1895. If William Crundall built it, the street was probably named after the Conservative!

Churchill Street runs from London Road to Granville Street. Originally intended to be Paul’s Street, it was actually named after Lord Randolph Churchill, father of Winston, who was a prominent Conservative MP when it was built in 1882.

Citadel Crescent is off Citadel Road, Western Heights. These houses were built for prison officers in the 1950s and the road named after the moated Napoleonic fortification near by which is now an Immigration Removal Centre.

Citadel Road is off South Military Road, Western Heights.  See Citadel Crescent. This road was built after 1971.
Claremont Place joined Castle Street to Castle Hill. Named in 1879, it is now part of Castle Street

Clarence Lawn ran from Marine Parade to Liverpool Street. The Duke of Clarence, later William IV, visited Dover more than once, including accompanying the Russian Czar and the King of Prussia to Britain when Louis XVIII returned to France in 1814. Built around 1840, it was demolished following Second World War damage. The Gateway flats now cover the site.

Clarence Place is off Lord Warden Square. Apparently, it was formerly called Crane Street, (and was so called in 1822 by the Paving Commissioners) or King’s Head Street before being named Clarence Place. The Duke of Clarence, later William IV, visited Dover more than once, including accompanying the Russian Czar and the King of Prussia to Britain in 1814. Running originally from Beach Street to the former Council House Street, it was part closed in 1968 and completely closed in 1977 except to provide access to the Cinque Ports’ Arms.

Clarence Street was a continuation of the old Townwall Street to Woolcomber Street. Originally called Townwall Lane, its name was changed to avoid confusion with Townwall Street. The Duke of Clarence, later William IV, visited Dover more than once, including accompanying the Russian Czar and the King of Prussia to Britain when Louis XVIII returned to France in 1814. The road was closed in 1954. Excavations in 1996 found origins dating back to the late 12th century and from 1550 onwards there were stone buildings on both sides. The south side was eventually cleared in the late 18th century to build a large mansion, Clarence House, which was itself demolished to build the enormous Burlington Hotel in 1864, comprising six storeys with 240 rooms. After a chequered history, the hotel was damaged during the Second World War and demolished in 1949..

Clarendon Gardens were at the top of Belgrave Road, comprising four dwellings. See Clarendon Street.

Clarendon Place runs from Clarendon Road to Birchwood Rise. See Clarendon Street.

Clarendon Road runs from Folkestone Road to Birchwood Rise. See Clarendon Street.

Clarendon Street from Birchwood Rise to Belgrave Road. Sir William Crundall built the Clarendon Estate and named it and several of its roads after Lord Clarendon, Foreign Secretary, who died in 1870 when building the estate began. Following war damage, some prefabs were erected in 1948.

Cleveland Approach was off Roosevelt Road, Buckland Estate.  Part of the post Second World War Buckland Housing Estate, where most of the streets were named after towns or locations in the Commonwealth or the United States, emphasising the role that the Commonwealth and the US played during the War. It was demolished in 1965 for redevelopment.

Cleveland Close, is off Roosevelt Road, Buckland Estate.Part of the post Second World War Buckland Housing Estate where most of the streets were named after towns or locations in the Commonwealth or the United States, emphasising the role that the Commonwealth and the US played during the War.

Cliff Court appears on an 1851 map between 93 and 94 Snargate Street.

Clinton Road – see Castlemount Road.

Coate’s Lane or Cupid’s Alley is mentioned in the Paving Commissioners’ minutes 1778

Colebran Street (called Colbourne Street) on an 1851 map. There were ratepayers of this name in St. Mary’s Parish as far back as 1717. Apparently Ruth Colebran was a clerk employed by Isaac Minet, the banker, who made money from privateering ventures. The street ran from Bridge Street to Brook Street and was built about 1840 on the site of St. Mary’s Poorhouse, erected in 1795, but which closed when the Dover Union workhouse opened in 1836. The road was closed in 1988 to allow Dover Engineering Works to expand.

Collins Lane existed in 1831and ran from Post Office Lane to Water Lane.

Colton Crescent, off Rokesley Road. Built in the 1960s and, like its neighbouring roads, it was named after a tower in Dover Castle, Colton Gate.

Commercial Quay was a continuation of Northampton Street to the beginning of Strond Street. The carriageway was built in 1834 on the west side of what became Wellington Dock called Pentside. Previously, it was only a pedestrian way although an inn existed in 1793. It was taken over and demolished by the Harbour Board in 1929 to provide wharves and a coal and timber yard.

Common Square (or Plain) was in or near Council House Street according to the Paving Commissioners’ minutes when paved in 1783.

Connaught Road runs from Frith Road to Castle Hill. Running along the foot of the park with the same name, it was named when the Duke and Duchess of Connaught opened the park in 1883.

Coombe Close is a cul de sac off Coombe Valley Road. See Coombe Valley Road for name.  It was redeveloped with sheltered accommodation during the 1990s.

Coombe Road is a modern cul de sac off Barwick Road leading to industrial premises only. See Coombe Valley Road for name.

Coombe Valley Road runs from London Road  to Poulton Close. Coombe Farm, originally part of the Manor of Barton known as Dudmascombe or Dead Man’s Coombe owned by Dover Priory, was at the country end of this road and became the town’s rubbish tip and in more recent times, an industrial estate. The road was called originally Union Road since it led to the Dover Union Workhouse built in 1836, but the name was changed in the 1960s to improve the image of Buckland Hospital, which the workhouse buildings had become. Dover’s horse races were held in Buckland Bottom through which the road now runs.

Copt Hill see Old Charlton Road

Council House Street ran from Clarence Place to Bulwark Street. The Council House or meeting house of the Harbour Board once stood in this Pier District street. One of the earliest streets in the Pier, it existed by 1641 and was shortened in the 19th century by the construction of the railway line. The remainder was finally demolished in 1968.

Cow Lane runs from Elms Vale Road to Church Road. It did not appear in Dover directories until after the Second World War. Formerly a track presumably used by cows on their way to pasture on the downs, it was the home of the Elms Vale Laundry until a disastrous fire. It was then demolished and replaced by modern houses, called Kingly Way, at the end of the 20th century

Cowgate Hill runs from York Street to the foot of the Western Heights. The Cow Gate was removed in 1776. It was sometimes known as the Common Gate, leading to the common where the townsfolk could graze their cattle. Part of the common became Cowgate Cemetery and the rest was built over. The road ran originally from the top of the old Queen Street, but now from modern York Street, to the cemetery.

Crabble Avenue runs from Hillside Road to Crabble Road (in River). Adopted in 1897, it was built upon in the same year as the adjacent Crabble Athletic Ground was laid out and opened. Crabble is an area centred round Crabble Farm and Crabble Corn Mill, but the source of the name is uncertain, possibly from ‘crabba’ a water rat or crab apple.

Crabble Hill from Buckland Bridge to the beginning of London Road, River and Crabble Road. It was laid out by the Turnpike Commissioners in the 18th century. The lower end was widened in 1955. See Crabble Avenue for name.

Crabble Meadows is a public road and then path from Buckland Bridge to Crabble Avenue over what were water meadows of the adjacent Dour. It provides access to St. Andrews Church.

Crafford Street runs from Dour Street to Maison Dieu Road. Mary Horsley claimed that it was planned by a builder named Crafford in 1868, but Bavington Jones and Terry Sutton maintain that it was named after John Crafford, Master of the Maison Dieu in Henry VIII’s reign. The corporation agreed the name in 1861.

Crane Street. It appears on Eldred’s map of 1641 and was possibly named after a primitive unloading crane. It is the earliest name for Clarence Place in the Pier District, which was also once called King’s Head Street after a public house dating from James I. See Clarence Place.

Cross Place. This name is given in some ancient documents to the Market Square where a cross was erected during fairs to signify that fairs originally had a religious character.

Crosswall ran from Union Street to Custom House Quay. Built upon the crosswall, which was constructed in 1661 to divide what became the Granville Dock from the Tidal Basin, it was rebuilt in 1737. It lost its houses with the coming of the railway, retaining only a fish market. Taken over by the Harbour Board it was closed to the public in 1954. Union Street was also once called Crosswall – being a damming wall built in 1583 to enclose the Pent (later the Wellington Dock).

Crown Court ran from St James Street to Townwall Street.

Cupid’s Alley or Coate’s Lane is mentioned in the Paving Commissioners’ minutes 1778. I wonder how it got this name?

Curlings Lane is mentioned in the Paving Commissioners’ Minutes 1786.

Curzon Road is a cul de sac off South Road, Tower Hamlets.  Built by 1912, Lord Curzon of Kedleston, a former Viceroy of India, was appointed Lord Warden in 1904, but soon resigned and was replaced by the Prince of Wales in 1905. He later held a number of seni or government posts.

Custom House Quay faced the Granville Dock. The original quay probably dates from 1670, but the Custom House, which gave the quay its name, stood there from 1682 and was rebuilt in 1806. In 1922 Customs moved its HQ to the sea front. The formation of the quay began about 1670 when houses and warehouses were built on the eastern side of Strond Street and private quays were constructed in front of them. It ran from Strond Street to Crosswall, but was virtually derelict by 1939 and was taken over by the Harbour Board, closed to the public and cleared of buildings in 1949.