3 December, 2020

N-O of Dover’s Streets, Ancient And Modern

Sourced by kind permission of Derek Leach from his book ‘Streets of Dover’

Napier Road ran from Auckland Crescent to Hobart Crescen. The obvious, but incorrect, reason for this name is that David Napier was the owner of ‘Rob Roy,’ the first steam vessel on the cross Channel service in 1820. In fact it is named after the New Zealand city devastated by an earthquake in 1931. It is part of the post Second World War Buckland Housing Estate, where most of the paths and streets were named after towns or locations in the Commonwealth or the United States, emphasising the role that they played during the War.

Natal Road is off Melbourne Avenue, Buckland Estate. It is part of the post Second World War Buckland Housing Estate, where most of the streets were named after towns or locations in the Commonwealth or the United States, emphasising the role that they played during the War.

Nevada Lane is off Winant Way, Buckland Estate. It was part of the post Second World War Buckland Housing Estate, where most of the paths and streets were named after towns or locations in the Commonwealth or the United States, emphasising the role that they played during the War. This path was closed in 1985 for redevelopment.

New Bridge is now pedestrianised from Townwall Street to Marine Parade. The actual bridge over the Dour was built in 1800 on the site of the medieval Severus Gate, demolished in 1762, above which was a chamber in the 14th and 15th centuries used by the King’s Customer who collected import and export duties. It was probably called ‘New’ to differentiate it from the old Buggin’s Bridge a little further up stream. A Custom House was built on the site in Elizabethan times with a platform and battery which became the Three Gun Battery. The new bridge provided a route from Bench Street to the North and Amherst batteries as well as to the Ropewalk on the shingle and Finnis’s timber yard where Camden Crescent and Cambridge Terrace were later built. New Bridge was widened for housing in 1836/40. The National Provincial Bank which had taken over, in 1842, Minet and Fector’s bank dating from 1686, built their Dover premises here which were occupied later by the Dover Harbour Board before it moved to Waterloo Crescent.

New Hampshire Way was off Winant Way, Buckland Estate. It was part of the post Second World War Buckland Housing Estate, where most of the paths and streets were named after towns or locations in the Commonwealth or the United States, emphasising the role that they played during the War. This path was closed in 1985 for redevelopment.

New Street runs from Biggin Street to York Street. Called Turne-Againe-Lane in a 1540 charter, it was renamed when houses were built upon it around 1785. The Paving Commissioners’ minutes describe New Street as ‘lately called Lampers Lane’.

New York Rise was on the Buckland Estate. It was part of the post Second World War Buckland Housing Estate, where most of the paths and streets were named after towns or locations in the Commonwealth or the United States, emphasising the role that they played during the War. This path was closed in 1985 for redevelopment.

Newbury Close is off Marlborough Road. It was built in 1966. Both Newbury and Marlborough are towns in Wiltshire.

Nightingale Road runs from Barton Road to Mayfield Avenue. Part of William Crundall’s Barton Estate laid out 1890-1900, it was adopted in 1902.

Noah’s Ark Road runs from the top of Edred Road, Tower Hamlets. This led to a dairy farm of the same name and was developed by the council in 1931. The farm probably obtained its name because it lay under the hill known as Mount Ararat. Following war damage, prefabs were erected in 1948.

Norman Street runs from Priory Road to Effingham Street. It was built on Priory Fields in 1846, which was part of the site of the Norman priory of St. Martin.

North Military Road is a continuation of Military Road to the Western Heights and was built by the military in the 19th century to provide access to the fortifications.

North Road is off South Road, Tower Hamlets. See Tower Hamlets Road. It is on the 1851 map but was not adopted until 1898.

North Street is a cul de sac off Longfield Road. This was close to a footpath over the Western Heights at North Bastion and was adopted in 1898.

Northampton Street ran from New Bridge to Commercial Quay.  Completed in 1854 and previously known as ‘Up the Pent’, it was named after the Earl of Northampton, Lord Warden in the time of James I who persuaded James in 1606 to take control of the harbour from the town and set up the forerunner of the Harbour Board. Prior to this road being built it was called Pentside and owners of Snargate Street properties could, at high tide, come out of their gardens and get into a boat. The General Post Office was once in this street as was the Sailors’ Bethel and the Wellington Hall, which was a popular public assembly place before the town purchased the Maison Dieu as the town hall. The street was closed in 1950 to provide more quay space.

Northbourne Avenue runs from Astor Avenue to Noah’s Ark Road.  Named after Lord Northbourne, a prominent Conservative and local landowner, by Sir William Crundall when he planned the road early in the 20th century, it was not built upon until 1925 when the corporation built the Astor Avenue Estate.

Oakvale Close is a cul de sac off Chestnut Road. This was built in 1989. The developer of this area was apparently keen on trees for street names.

Odo Road runs from Widred Road to South Road. It was built in 1865. Odo, Bishop of Bayeux, was half brother to William the Conqueror. This powerful man was made Earl of Kent and Constable of Dover Castle. See Tower Hamlets Road.

Oil Mill Lane was off Limekiln Street.

Old Bank Lane was probably by Isaac Minet’s bank in the Pier District and was still there in 1841.

Old Charlton Road is a continuation of Frith Road in Charlton Parish to the Guston boundary.

Old Folkestone Road is a continuation of South Military Road. This was part of an old pack horse track to Folkestone, which became a turnpike road in 1763, but lost its status 20 years later when the new Folkestone Road was opened through Maxton and Farthingloe.

Old Park Avenue runs from London Road to Knight’s Way and takes its name from the Old Park estate upon which it was built. The old mansion was largely rebuilt by Major R. B. Lawes around 1870. This road was adopted in 1908.

Old Park Hill is a continuation of Brookfield Avenue to the town boundary. Adopted in 1923, it takes its name from the Old Park estate upon which it was built. The old mansion was largely rebuilt by Major R. B. Lawes around 1870. This road was adopted in 1908.

Old Park Road runs from Crabble Hill to Brookfield Avenue. Adopted in 1905, it takes its name from the Old Park estate upon which it was built. The old mansion was largely rebuilt by Major R. B. Lawes around 1870. This road was adopted in 1908.

Old Post Office Lane was in the Pier District and was still there in 1841.

Old St. Margaret’s Road.  See Upper Road.

Ontario Way was on the Buckland Estate. It was part of the post Second World War Buckland Housing Estate where most of the paths and streets were named after towns or locations in the Commonwealth or the United States, emphasising the role that they played during the War. This path was closed in 1985 for redevelopment.

Orange Walk  is mentioned in the Paving Commissioners’ Minutes 1822. See Liverpool Street.

Oregon Path was off Roosevelt Road, Buckland Estate. It was part of the post Second World War Buckland Housing Estate where most of the paths and streets were named after towns or locations in the Commonwealth or the United States, emphasising the role that they played during the War. This path was closed in 1985 for redevelopment.

Oswald Place is off Oswald Road. It was built by William Kingsford in 1871 and named after  St. Oswald, King of Northumbria 634-642.

Oswald Road runs from St. Radigund’s Road to Bunker’s Hill. It was built by William Kingsford in 1871 and named after  St. Oswald, King of Northumbria 634-642.

Ottawa Crescent is off Melbourne Avenue, Buckland Estate. It is part of the post Second World War Buckland Housing Estate where most of the streets were named after towns or locations in the Commonwealth or the United States, emphasising the role that they played during the War.

Ottawa Way was off Ottawa Crescent, Buckland Estate. It was part of the post Second World War Buckland Housing Estate where most of the streets were named after towns or locations in the Commonwealth or the United States, emphasising the role that they played during the War. It was closed in 1978 for redevelopment.

Over the Wall is included in the 1835 Pier Ward list and in  the 1841 census had just one house. No doubt it took its name from being outside the old town walls.

Oxenden Lane was off Oxenden Street. See Oxenden Street.

Oxenden Street ran from Town Station to Harbour Station. Built by 1841 on land formed when the Old Paradise Pent in the Pier District was drained, it was named after Sir Henry Oxenden of Broome Park, an energetic member of the Harbour Board for 44 years who directed harbour improvements from 1791 until 1832. It was demolished in 1923 as part of a slum clearance programme.