28 September, 2020

P-R of Dover’s Streets, Ancient And Modern

Sourced by kind permission of Derek Leach from his book ‘Streets of Dover’

Paddock (The) is off Maison Dieu Road. Houses were built in 1886 in what was the paddock of Brook House, built by William Moxon. The private Dover High School was built on one side and was occupied in 1905 by the girls of Dover County School.

Palmerston Terrace was in Charlton Green. Named after Lord Palmerston, Prime Minister and 119th Lord Warden, it was built in 1868 facing the river on Charlton Green.

Paper Alley was off Bridge Street. This was the name given to the first houses built on the north side of Bridge Street soon after1828 even though the nearest paper mill was some distance away. The connection may be that William Kingsford owned the land as well as an oilcake mill at Charlton, a flour mill at Buckland (later called Mannering’s Mill) and a paper mill opposite. It was later rebuilt and renamed Paul’s Place.

Paradise Lane was off Paradise Street. See Paradise Street.

Paradise Pent is mentioned in the Paving Commissioners’ Minutes 1822.

Paradise Street ran from Oxenden Street to Round Tower Lane. Built on the site of the original Paradise harbour, it was demolished in 1913 as part of a slum clearance programme.

Pardoner’s Way runs from Pilgrim’s Way to Old Park Hill. Built in 1925, it is one of the post First World War streets on the Buckland Estate that take their names from characters in Chaucer’s Canterbury Tales.

Parfitt Way is off Mayfield Avenue. It was built in 1995 and named after Keith Parfitt, an archaeologist with the Canterbury Archaeological Trust that in 1994 excavated an Anglo-Saxon cemetery of 200 graves discovered on this site.

Paris Yard was built on land behind the Paris Hotel near the Grand Shaft and was later renamed St. John’s Place. See St. John’s Place.

Parish Yard off Snargate Street appears in an 1875 directory.

Park Avenue runs from Maison Dieu Road to Connaught Road. Part of the Dover Castle Estate, it leads to Connaught Park, which was opened in 1883 by the Duke and Duchess of Connaught. The road dates from 1885.

Park Mews was off Dour Street and appears in an 1898 directory. See Park Street.

Park Place ran from Ladywell to Dour Street and Park Street. See Park Street.

Park Road runs from Brookfield Avenue to Heathfield Avenue. Adopted in 1935, it presumably takes its name from Old Park. See Old Park Road..

Park Street is a continuation of Ladywell to Five Ways. It was built in 1863 and was to be called Ladywell by the Corporation, but some of the new residents had already had their properties named as Park Street in their title deeds as the road ran beside the boundary wall of Maison Dieu Park. The residents won.

Parson’s Lane is mentioned in Paving Commissioners’ minutes 1783

Parson’s Way runs from Pilgrim’s Way to Pardoner’s Way.  It is one of the post WW I streets on the Buckland Estate that take their names from characters in Chaucer’s Canterbury Tales.

Paul’s Place is off Bridge Street. In the parish of Charlton, it was built on land long known as Paul’s Corner, possibly named after one of the patron saints of the parish church. See Paper Alley.

Paul’s Street – see Churchill Street.

Paxton’s Lane was in the Pier District and is mentioned in Paving Commissioners’ minutes 1783

Pear Tree Lane ran from Adrian Street to Chapel Place.This used to be a continuation of Five Post Lane into Chapel Place known as Above Wall. Apparently a very fine pear tree hung over the wall of a garden at the corner of the lane in Adrian Street. It was demolished when Adrian Street was redeveloped.

Pencester Road runs from Maison Dieu Road to Biggin Street. Stephen de Pencester helped Hubert de Burgh defend Dover Castle against the French in 1216 and became Constable of the Castle. He is buried in the church at Penshurst, his country seat. The road was constructed in 1860 and its bridge in 1863 to connect the town centre with the newly developed Maison Dieu Road. Gunman’s Mansion was demolished to provide entry to Biggin Street.

Pentside is mentioned in the Paving Commissioners’ minutes in 1778 and was a narrow strip on the landward side of the Pent (which became Wellington Dock in 1846) behind Snargate Street, suitable only for pedestrians. It became Commercial Quay in 1834.

Percival Terrace off Winchelsea Road appears in street directories in the early 1900s.

Perth Way is a path off Auckland Crescent, Buckland Estate. It was part of the post Second World War Buckland Housing Estate where most of the paths and streets were named after towns or locations in the Commonwealth or the United States, emphasising the role that they played during the War.

Peter Street. Originally called St. Peter’s Street it now runs from High Street to Branch Street. Laid out in 1830 in the parish of Charlton, it was not completely built upon until 1872, according to Bavington Jones. It was named after one of the patron saints of the parish church. The north side of the street was built on part of the site of St. Mary’s Poorhouse, which was closed in 1836 when St. Mary’s Parish joined the River Union And its new workhouse in Buckland Bottom. The street ran originally from High Street to Maison Dieu Road, but part was demolished in 1959 to allow Dover Engineering Works to expand. Only a short stretch remains, from the High Street into modern Branch Street.

Peverell Road is off Rokesley Road. Built in the mid 1960s, it took its name from one of the towers of Dover Castle. William Peverell, Lord of Wrensted, received 14 knights’ fees (grants of land) in return for fighting for the king personally and providing other men. He provided three knights a month for five months a year to help defend the castle.

Phoenix Lane ran from St James’s Street to Dolphin Lane. It was not named until 1879. Presumably it took its name from the adjacent Leney’s brewery. It was closed in 1955.

Piddock’s Lane ran into Strond Street and is mentioned in Paving Commissioners’ minutes 1781.

Pierce’s Court was off Last Lane. This was a small offshoot from Last Lane named after the owner. The first Dover playhouse opened here in 1780, but it transferred to Snargate Street in 1790.

Pierce’s Lane is mentioned in Paving Commissioners’ minutes 1781. This was the name of a local paving contractor and may have been the origin of the name.

Pilgrim’s Way is off London Road, River. Built in 1925, it is one of the streets in the Buckland Estate built before the Second World War which all take their names from characters in Chaucer’s Canterbury Tales.

Pilgrims Place was in St. Radigund’s Road. This row of old cottages recognised the many pilgrims that must have passed on their way to St. Radigund’s Abbey.

Pilots’ Walk, South Pier is mentioned in the Paving Commissioners’ Minutes 1797

Pioneer Road is off Crabble Hill. The land was purchased from Mr. Murray Lawes of Old Park by George Solly who laid out the road and according to Terry Sutton said, ‘Let’s call it Pioneer Road since we pioneered it!’

Pleasant Row ran from Durham Hill to Bowling Green Lane. The area was called Mount Pleasant before it became thickly populated in the early 19th century and had a fine view of the bay, castle and surrounding hills. It was demolished during the 1930s as part of a slum clearance programme.

Polhill’s Lane near Ship Lane is mentioned in the Paving Commissioners’ Minutes 1822.

Portland Place ran from Durham Hill to Cowgate Hill. The King Alfred public house was at number 1 in 1800. It was probably named after the third Duke of Portland, a leading Whig politician who became nominal prime minister of a Pitt government in 1807.

Poulton Close is at the top of Coombe Valley Road. This road, adopted in 1973 as part of an industrial estate, is named after the adjoining valley. Poulton was once a parish but now boasts only a farm.

Pretoria Terrace was laid out by Major Lawes soon after the Boer War and named after the town where the Boers surrendered. It was later renamed Brookfield Avenue. See Brookfield Avenue.

Primrose Place is off Primrose Road. See Primrose Road.

Primrose Road is off Coombe Valley Road. It was built in 1865 and named in 1879 after General Primrose who distinguished himself in the Afghan War. The council extended it in 1933/34.

Princes Street once ran from York Street to Queen Street, but now is a short street from Durham Hill to Cowgate Hill. Considering when it was built, it was possibly named after the Prince Regent.

Prioress Walk is a path from Pilgrim’s Way to Shipman’s Way, Buckland Estate. All the streets in the Buckland Estate built before the Second World War took their names from characters in Chaucer’s Canterbury Tales. This was built in 1932.

Priory Gate Road is off Station Approach. It was built soon after the opening in 1871 of Dover College on the old priory site and was adopted in 1896.

Priory Grove is a cul de sac off Priory Hill. See Priory Hill.

Priory Hill is off High Street.  Several streets leading to or close to the remains of St. Martin’s Priory, now Dover College, use the word Priory. Priory Hill dates from 1881.

Priory Place ran from New Street to Priory Street and is mentioned in the Paving Commissioners’ Minutes 1822. See Priory Road.

Priory Road runs from Biggin Street to Priory Street. Several streets leading to or close to the remains of St. Martin’s Priory, now Dover College, use the word Priory. Previously called Priory Place, Norman Terrace and St. Martin’s Terrace, they were renamed Priory Road in 1872.

Priory Steps run from Priory Gate Road to Priory Hill and Priory Hill to Tower Street (also known as Trafalgar Steps).

Priory Street runs from Biggin Street to Priory Road. Several streets leading to or close to the remains of St. Martin’s Priory, now Dover College use the word Priory. Priory Street dates from 1783 according to a Dover Express article of 1896.

Prospect Place is at the top of Edgar Road  and was built at the same time. It possibly took the name because of the fine prospect from its position on the hill.

Queen Elizabeth Square was in the Pier District. A Methodist chapel was there in 1795. The square was partly demolished to make way for the railway and became known as ‘40 feet road’ until named in 1878.

Queen Elizabeth Street ran from Crosswall to Holy Trinity Parsonage in the Pier District.

Queen Street Lane ran from Queen Street to Tavenor’s Lane and presumably took its name from Queen Street.

Queen Street. It used to run from King Street to Princes Street, but now ends at York Street (from 1972). It was possibly so named because it was the road in the town taken by Elizabeth I in 1573 on arrival from Folkestone after entering the town via Cow Gate. This was probably the greatest pageantry Dover has ever seen with the tail end of the procession still climbing out of Folkestone when the Queen entered Dover. There were a thousand distinguished people on horseback and a thousand wagons each pulled by six horses and 7,000 horses in total.

Queen’s Avenue is off Elms Vale Road. The wife of George V, Queen Mary, is commemorated in this name since the couple were celebrating their Silver Jubilee in 1935 when this road and the adjoining King’s Road were built. It was adopted in 1951.

Queen’s Court was off New Street and was demolished during the 1930s as part of a slum clearance programme.

Queen’s Gardens run from Worthington Street to New Stree. This area was part of the lands of the Maison Dieu and, following the Dissolution, became Crown property. By Elizabeth I’s reign it had become a garden and was probably named after her. Robert Kennet owned the ground in Charles I’s reign when he used it as pasture for his sheep, which were then slaughtered and sold in his Biggin Street shop. The Gunmans of Pencester Road owned it and later, George Dell, a surgeon. W.S.Colyer and Richard Winder leased the ground from William Finnis in 1817 and built two rows of houses on it, retaining the original name.

Randolph Road is off Coombe Valley Road. Lord Randolph Churchill, father of Winston, was a prominent Conservative MP and Chancellor of the Exchequer in the 1880s. Sir William Crundall, a Conservative and the developer of this street, named it after him. Following war damage, prefabs were erected in 1948. It was stopped up in 1977. When new houses were built for hospital staff off Coombe Valley Road in the 1990s, the new road was named Randolph Road.

Reading Road is off Elms Vale Road. The Marquis of Reading was Lord Warden in 1934 when this road was laid out.

Red Pump Square See Blenheim Square.

Regina Way was off Melbourne Avenue, Buckland Estate. It was part of the post Second World War Buckland Housing Estate where most of the paths and streets were named after towns or locations in the Commonwealth or the United States, emphasising the role that they played during the War. This path was closed in 1985 for redevelopment.

Reynold’s Court  See Freeman’s Cottages.

Richard’s Lane  is mentioned in the Paving Commissioners’ Minutes 1832.

Rokesley Road is off Melbourne Avenue.  It was built in the 1960s by the council and named after Rokesley Tower in Dover Castle. This was named after the Manor of Roxley near Lenham which was granted to William de Crevequer, Lord of Leeds, by William the Conqueror in return for fighting for the king and providing men to help guard the castle.

Roosevelt Road is off Green Lane, Buckland Estate. It was built after the Second World War and named after the US wartime president.

Round Tower Lane ran from Paradise Street to Oxenden Street. See Round Tower Street for name. Built by 1641, it was demolished in 1913 as part of a slum clearance programme.

Round Tower Passage was near Harbour Station.  See Round Tower Street.

Round Tower Street ran from Oxenden Street to Harbour Station.  The street was built by 1737 and ran parallel with the site of John Clarke’s pier or sea wall, built with towers in Henry VII’s reign. The wall ran from Archcliffe Fort to South Pier Head, making a safe haven for boats that became known as Paradise Pent. The towers are featured in the famous painting depicting Henry VIII embarking for the Field of Cloth of Gold in 1520. Part of one of the towers stood as late as 1813. The street was demolished to make way for the new railway link between the London Chatham and Dover line and the South East Railway line in the late 19th century.

Ruffin’s Court was off Princes Street. Apparently in this court was a room let to the elite of Dover for private theatricals. It was named after Thomas Ruffin, the builder, who was born in 1705. In addition to building, he sold sheep’s trotters and tripe in the town and neighbouring villages. He was also a bell ringer at St. Mary’s and a sexton of the nearby St. Martin’s burial ground. He was immortalised by Lord Byron who asked Thomas to show him the grave of Churchill, the poet. Ruffin replied, ‘He died before my day of sextonship and I had not the digging of his grave’.

Rugby Road connects Manor Road to Folkestone Road. Apparently this short unmade road, containing a few post WWII houses, was so named at the suggestion of a resident from Rugby.

Ruskin Terrace was on the Buckland Estate. This is another of the post Second World War streets and paths in ‘Poets’ Corner’ on the Buckland Estate. This path was closed in 1985 for redevelopment.

Russell Place ran from Russell Street to Golden Cross Passage. Built in 1838 and named after Lord John Russell, it was closed in 1986.

Russell Place was off Russell Street and takes it name from it.

Russell Street runs from Castle Street to Townwall Street. Built in 1831 when the great Reform Bill was proposed by Lord John Russell who later became Prime Minister. In 1897 it ran from Castle Street to Dolphin Lane only and then became Fector’s Place, but now covers the road to Townwall Street.

Rutland Road is off Glenfield Road. This unadopted road was built at the beginning of the 20th century and was presumably named after the smallest county in England.